Diabetes: The Facts [INFOGRAPHIC]

Diabetes: The Facts The number of Americans with diabetes has tripled over the last 30 years – and experts see no end to the trend. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention predicts that the number of people with diabetes will continue to rise, until 1 in 3 people could have the disease by 2050. Getting more physical activity and sleep, eating a healthier diet, and managing stress are all lifestyle changes that can cut the risk for diabetes – and obesity. This infographic from Tractivity Online shows the Causes, number of affected people, the cost related to diabetes and ways of prevention.

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The Disability Disconnect [INFOGRAPHIC]

Think you’re invincible? You’re not alone. Most working Americans drastically underestimate the odds of experiencing an income-interrupting injury or illness that will last an extended period of time. Now consider that more than one in four of today’s 20-year-olds will have their income interrupted by a disability before they retire. That’s because some top causes of long-term disabilities aren’t catastrophic accidents, but common, everyday health issues like back pain, heart disease, arthritis, cancer, even pregnancy. No matter how healthy, everybody has a risk that is too high to ignore. You’ve probably protected your most prized possessions from damages and accidents, but what about the resource that makes all others possible — your paycheck? Learn more about the causes of disability and how you can defend your income from them at DisabilityCanHappen.org.

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Health Infographic – How to Choose an Orthodontist

Did you know that there are braces that go behind your teeth? Or that some braces take a shorter time to work than others? These are the kinds of things you should be aware of before you step into an orthodontist’s office. There are many styles of braces, and not all orthodontists are properly trained to apply them all. If you decide which type of braces you would like before you go, traditional or hidden, you can find someone who can definitely give you the treatment options you are looking for. However, these aren’t the only factors to consider. Use this infographic to make an informed decision.

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Addiction Infographic: What is Binge Drinking

Binge drinking is not a problem that is just limited to what people consider alcoholism, but it can still have severe and long-term consequences. A person is binge drinker if they have consumed more than four or five drinks (for women and for men, respectively) in a sitting, which is usually a 2-3 hour period. Binge drinkers may not be physically addicted to alcohol, and may even drink once a week or less. However, because drinking too much impairs many brain and body functions, binge drinkers are often at higher risk of performing dangerous behaviors, both violent and sexual.

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Addiction Infographic – The Highs and Lows of Oxycontin

Oxycontin is one of the most commonly abused prescription drugs in the United States. Prescribed as a painkiller, Oxycontin’s packaging contained a warning not to crush the drug. This was meant as an honest warning against people mixing it in their drinks to make it easier to take. However, most people were curious about the warning, so they crushed the tablets, resulting in a strong high. Because of the opiates in Oxycontin, it became very easy for those who abused this high to become physically addicted. This infographic by the Delray Recovery Center.

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Health Infographic – The Dangers of Crack Cocaine

Rehab in Florida Crack cocaine is an addictive substance that has become widespread in the United States because of its addictive qualities and relative cheapness. Using crack results in a strong high, with an equally strong low afterwards. These severe ups and downs can increase the risk of heart attack and stroke due to high blood pressure. Rehab in Florida has created this infographic to help you learn more about the risks.

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Health Infographic – Are Infant Reflux Drugs Worth the Risks?

The number of babies prescribed acid suppression drugs such as H2 blockers and PPIs grew 8-fold during 2002 to 2009, but fewer than 10% received any diagnostic testing for GERD (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease). Some pediatricians are growing concerned that the “epidemic” of infant GERD cases is actually due to over-diagnosis, especially since clinical trials show acid blockers work no better than a placebo and can actually lead to short term and long term side effects. The FDA has not approved PPIs for treatment of GERD in children younger than one year.

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